The “extreme” backpacking of Pilot Mountain in Pisgah National Forest

Well we finally got to the top of Pilot Mountain in the Pisgah National Forest, but the adventure was freaking exhausting. I know what your thinking, “how extreme can it be?” I’m about to tell you! If you remember our last backpacking trip we also went to the Pisgah National Forest and part of our hike was supposed to go through Deep Gap and over Pilot Mountain. Our plan that trip was to hike in enough that we could get up early that first morning and watch the sunrise from the top of Pilot Mountain. Unfortunately, we never made it because we couldn’t find the right trail and didn’t bring a map (we learned our lesson), so we ended up just relaxing by Cove Creek Falls for 2 days. This time there was not much relaxing to be had!

First off, we loaded our packs Thursday night, so we could leave straight after work on Friday. The plan was to get to Asheville, NC area Friday night and stay at a KOA. That way we didn’t have a 4+ hour drive Saturday morning allowing us to hit the trail bright and early and hopefully cover most of the miles on Saturday. We wanted to keep Sunday light and be back to the car no later than 12 so that we could go to an apple orchard on our way home (more on this in another post). Unfortunately it was around 10pm and raining when we pulled into the KOA. Instead of setting up the tent, we decided to just fold down the seats in the back of Subie (that’s our awesome adventure vehicle, aka Subaru Outback) and sleep there. A bonus to staying at a KOA was getting a shower before we embarked on another EPIC adventure in the woods.

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Once we arrived at Pisgah, our first stop was the Ranger station so we that we could inform them of our planned route and see if there were any closures on the trails; I also wanted to get a feel of mileage for our route from the “Rangers”. From the National Geographic Map we purchased previously the route was around 8 miles to the Deep Gap Shelter (a man made lean-to) via the Davidson, Daniel Ridge Loop, Farlow Gap and the Art Loeb trails. The Ranger said that part of the Daniel Ridge Loop was closed so we avoided that, she also said that we should be at Deep Gap between 7-8.5 miles. Then day 2 would be more Art Loeb, then follow the Butter Gap trail back to where we parked bringing the total mileage to approximately 15 miles. Sounded about right to me; so we drove to the trail head located up the road a few miles at the fish hatchery, parked good old Subie and loaded on our gear.

The weather was overcast, sprinkling, and in the mid 60’s, so we suited up our packs with our backpack rain covers and then put our ponchos over us and the bags. This was my first time using my custom backpack rain cover, and my first time using my Frogg Toggs poncho (all reviews of used gear will be done in a later post). We figured as long as our bodies and our packs stayed dry we would be sipping hot cocoa in the tent in “7-8.5 miles”.

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The hike was beautiful, the first 3 miles were relatively flat on the Davidson trail and FS475 (forest service road 475). From there we cut off on the Daniel Ridge loop, stopping along the way to check out an amazing waterfall.

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How cool are all these stacked rocks!

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We got lucky enough to run into people at the falls and they took our picture.

Further along the Daniel Ridge loop, the incline started. It wasn’t bad at first but gradually continued to increase; rocks kept getting bigger and the trail got more rugged. We crossed over a few creeks on the way (with all the rain the creeks were fairly high and crossing was a bit trickier). At roughly 6.5/7 miles we turned off onto Farlow Gap trail.

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The fog was crazy awesome the whole time.

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One of the creeks we crossed

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Oh Farlow Gap, this whole stretch was grueling. At least 3 miles of intense uphill, with the last bit climbing 2000 feet within ½ a mile (it was just shy of climbing on all fours). Not going to lie I had to stop many, many times to catch my breath and get some snacks (and curse under my breath). We finally reached the Farlow Gap/Art Loeb intersection at around 9.5 mile, and we were both like “WTF” this was crazy and we still had to travel down the Art Loeb at least 2 mile to get to the camp site at Deep Gap. By this time we had been hiking for around 5 hours, we were tired, hungry, and the constant rain was getting us soggy (and grumpy). Unfortunately we didn’t get any pictures of the steepest part of the trail, we were both just trying to survive, taking pictures was out of the question!

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We proceeded down the Art Loeb trail for about 2 miles going around Sasafrass ridge (which at the time we didn’t know was Sasafrass Ridge) and finally coming to a 3 way fork in the road. The only one that was labeled was the middle fork, it was labeled as the “Art Loeb Trail” and since Deep Gap was supposed to be right along the trail we took that route.

This was actually the route to climb to the peak of Pilot Mountain (although we didn’t know it at the time). The trail was long with lots of switchbacks and the wind was whipping the rain in our faces. We stopped to eat some jerky and nuts since it had been almost 6 hours since we had our last meal. When we reached the peak we thought it was Sasafrass Ridge. It felt awesome to be so high up, however with all the rain and heavy fog there really wasn’t any view to be had. But we figured it would be fine because we would stay at Deep Gap and hike the 1/2 mile or so to the top of Pilot mountain in the morning and hopefully have a better view. This is when Sheena was like “ we should be there by now” and I was like “heck yeah, we should, but the maps says that the camp site is on the Art Loeb. So lets keep going”.

I was really looking forward to a covered shelter and I knew we had to be so close. We continued to push on despite feeling like our knees were going to give any moment. This part of the trail didn’t seem to have had a lot of traffic recently and was overgrown with brush and tree branches. It was very narrow, downward steep and crazy rocky. The down hill was far worse on our knees than the up hill, more than once Sheena lost her footing and almost fell (she actually did fall once).

Despite all the craziness we kept going down, down, down, until around 13 miles we come across a forest service road. At this point it was 7pm and getting dark, we had been hiking for 9 hours. We were cold, soaked to the bone, our bodies hurt (Sheena was limping with a bad knee acting up) and we were crazy hungry.

We were both getting a little grumpy, so I said “ here’s what were going to do: either set up camp on this forest service road or go back up to that last camp spot we saw like ¼ back up the trail”. Sheena was like “we are absolutely not setting our tent up on a forest service road” so we opted for the hike back up the trail.

Once we were at a camp site we threw up a tarp (but not before I had a mini breakdown about how to get it up), and assembled the tent in record time below the tarp. Sheena jumped in and changed into warm dry clothes. Meanwhile I adjusted the tarp (because I was not going to come out of the tent until morning). I finally got in, completely drenched. I have never been happier to get into dry clothes. We were starving so I broke out the cook gear, and made a warm dinner and hot cocoa. Finally our adventure had taken a turn for the better (being warm, dry and having a full belly changes your outlook but not as much as being snuggled up with your wife after a 14 mile super hike).

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After dinner we decided to take another look at the map and figure out exactly where we were at. I used my new eTrex 10 to verify our lat/long with the known map coordinates. This resulted in us seeing that we had apparently taken the wrong trail and overshot the Deep Gap shelter by like 4 miles. Damn, that sucked. We worked out a plan for the next day and went back to bed. The sound of the rain bouncing off the tarp all night kept waking us up thinking there were animals right outside. I got up during the night a few times to make sure no animals had got to our food (it was in a bag high up in the tree).

The next morning, we both awoke bright eyed and bushy tailed (hardly rested but happy to have a plan and not be lost!), ate some delicious homemade oatmeal, and commenced to pack everything up. The Hammocks and Hideaways team knocked all the camp chores out and hit the road around 915. The knowledge that we had less than 6 miles ahead of us and that warm dry Subie was patiently awaiting our return, quieted our barking dogs and and helped our knees.

We traveled down the rest of the Art Loeb trail .6 miles and hit the Forest Service Road 475 which we knew led back to Subie (we double checked with the eTrex and the map, just to make sure). The hike back we were in high spirits. Our knee’s didn’t hurt as much and the Forest Service roads were a lot easier to walk on than rocks and roots. We knocked this out quickly and met Subie in the parking lot, jumped in, and started dreaming about our next adventure. Our first stop was to the ranger station to change into clean clothes and I always like to chat it up with the Rangers. Ya know, let them know how things went.

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We were happy to get back to Subie right around 12 leaving us ample time to hit the apple orchard (Sheena was super excited about this) and get home at a decent time. Once again, our adventure didn’t turn out quite as planned and although we had some rough moments we are excited to get back out there and plan our next adventure. We seem to learn something every time which is always good. Until next time, Happy Adventuring!

Do you have a rain-filled adventure that was still a good time?

D.I.Y. Waterproof Matches Two Types

As promised, I did a D.I.Y. of two different types of ways to “waterproof” strike anywhere matches. First I got the required parts together as follows:

  1. Strike anywhere matches, (hard to find we probably spent $10 in gas driving around to find these from Home Depot to Lowes, to Bi-Lo, to Publix, to Walgreens (yes Amazon had them for $2 if you have Prime). But we eventually found them at Ace Hardware for $1.46 (tax included). Wooo Wooo bargain hunters.
  2. Dollar Tree Finger nail polish (I had bought it to use for metal engraving. We will get to that another time)
  3. Old wax, first off our house always smells amazing (except when I cook, I just so happen to like my food a bit burned, but Sheena doesn’t). Ok, Ok, sometimes I burn stuff and it stinks the whole house up, who hasn’t. Anyway the point is our house smells amazing because Sheena always has these delicious smelling waxes or oils burning. Well she had some old stuff that didn’t smell as strong I guess and she gave it to me for “The Cause”.
  4. Wax paper,  wet stuff doesn’t stick to them I guess.

 

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The first ones I tried were with the finger nail polish. At first I was painting it on with the small brush in the bottle, but eventually I just started dipping the head in (in other words i got lazy and impatient). Key with the polish is that you have to dip it let it dry like 10 minutes and than dip it again and let it dry for 15 minutes, because if you don’t the paint comes off in the water.

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Next, I did the oil one’s. These were a lot easier. Just dip them in, set them to dry for 2 minutes and then do it again. The whole thing takes like 10 minutes.

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I let both of them sit in the water for 20 minutes once dry and you guessed it they both worked great.

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In the future if I have to do a lot more for camping or backpacking I’m going to do them with the wax (they work great, repel water great, and best of all smell delicious when burned)

Well that’s the post, how did you like it? Have you heard of another way to “waterproof matches”? Try it for yourself and let me know how it goes for you.

Happy adventuring.